Gift packaging for the festival of lights

Less stuff, more packaging

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Diwali gift aisle at the Big Bazaar supermarket at Mall of India in Noida. Photo PSA
Diwali gift aisle at the Big Bazaar supermarket at Mall of India in Noida. Photo PSA

One of the most important Indian festivals of the year, Diwali is about celebrating togetherness and sharing joy and love. The tradition of sharing and giving gifts is an old practice that is followed still. Earlier, homemade sweets were shared when Indians depended on farming for a livelihood, but with rapid urbanization and time-bound lifestyles, prepacked gifts make an ideal gift option. With Diwali just around the corner, local markets to street vendors are already preparing for the season of festivities. Diwali gift options can be seen adorning the shelves in supermarkets and local shops.

Traditional sweet in a new garb

Traditional sweets and snacks packaged in a monocarton box with plastic lamination. Photo PSA
Traditional sweets and snacks packaged in a monocarton box with plastic lamination. Photo PSA

The lifestyle and mindset of the modern Indian might be changing with time and global interconnectivity, but when it comes to festivals, there is an effort to preserve and maintain the traditional values and culture. The tradition of gifting and having sweets is still a prominent part of the Diwali festival. But consumers no longer have to go to a halwai to get the sweets, they can now be bought from retail stores and supermarkets. Brands such as Bicano and Haldiram’s use plastic molded trays to hold the sweets in place and to maintain their form which is then lidded with a film and then packaged in a carton box that is laminated with plastic. Branded chocolate gift packs from Cadbury and Amul come in similar cartons with thermoformed trays inside.

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Reusable metal packaging for a premium look

Paper Boat drinks packaged in a metal box resembling a metal tiffin box. Photo PSA
Paper Boat drinks packaged in a metal box resembling a metal tiffin box. Photo PSA

Metal packaging has always been a favorite in the premium gift packaging segment, especially in the confectionery segment. The long life of tin packaging allows
consumers to reuse the box which in turn with appropriately long-lasting decoration keeps promoting the brand.

Thinking out of the box, Paper Boat, the traditional Indian beverages produced and marketed by Hector Beverages, is using metal packaging for its Diwali gift range. The metal box contains the company’s distinctly shaped pouches with a reclosable cap for the traditional flavors that the company is known for. Reflecting the simplicity of the product inside as well as its brand recognition, the Paper Boat gift packs come in rectangular boxes in solid primary colors. With the minimalist printed decoration of school supplies, the box evokes nostalgia and memories of childhood – a central theme of Paper Boat products.

Customized gift hampers

Custom gift hampers with assorted products packaged in a carton basket and plastic lamination. Photo PSA
Custom gift hampers with assorted products packaged in a carton basket and plastic lamination. Photo PSA

Borrowing from the Western idea of seasonal gift items in a basket, Indian retailers
are creating custom gift hampers of paperboard that may contain edibles, cosmetics, and utilities. Topped with a bow and completely wrapped in plastic film, the gift hampers make a popular gift choice where the giver can see the variety of products from a mix of brands.
While supermarkets provide prepacked gift hampers, local retailers give a choice to the consumers to create customized gift hampers. By letting consumers choose what items to put inside a decorated monocarton box or a paperboard basket based on their preference, the local retailers can add the value of packaging to their selection. In many cases, the value of the packaging has increased in relation to the product

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Akanksha
Correspondent. Akanksha Meena is striving to learn to write and the fundamentals of publishing with every opportunity with hopes of being able to write something worth publishing someday. She works as a correspondent with Indian Printer and Publisher and Packaging South Asia. In her free time, she can be found pursuing her other interests such as reading, writing, sketching, and painting.

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