Yamir Packaging’s expansion during the Covid-19 pandemic

Startups boost short-run jobs for monocartons & labels

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Yamir Packaging
Hyuma Mahhadevia with the Bobst Novacut maachine at the Yamir Packaging plant in Kadi, Gujarat. Photo PSA

The Yamir Packaging Group started somewhere around 1975 in a small nook in Ahmedabad with basic stationary work. In 1984, the company moved to Bharuch where it set up its first packaging plant for monocartons and subsequently set up three more plants in the Bharuch industrial area over the past 30 years. Yamir, which currently has a turnover of Rs 110 crore, recently set up another sprawling plant with 55,000 square feet of working space in Kadi in Gujarat’s Mehsana district.

The name ‘Yamir’ comes from the Sanskrit word for the crescent moon which is also reflected in Yamir Packaging’s logo. Towards the end of 2021, the new Kadi plant started with a Koenig & Bauer 6-color Rapida 105 with inline coating, and postpress machines from Bobst

Yamir has carved a niche for itself in the food packaging space over its 47 years of existence and counts Amul, Hershey’s, Nestle, and Colgate among its top clients. Hyuma Mahadevia, the executive director of Yamir Packaging said to Packaging South Asia, that most of these client relationships have been cemented for 15-20 years. A monocarton specialist, all of Mahadevia’s plants also produce eFlute and other micro-fluted litho laminated cartons for the Indian packaging industry.

Yamir Packaging
A sample monocarton produced using the Bobst machines. Photo PSA

“We have a very small plant in Ahmedabad where we do many short-term pharma jobs and then in Bharuch, we have two plants which are into printed corrugation and produce eFlute and end flute cartons. Our mother plant is in Mandwa which is near Lankeshwar,” shares Mahadevia.

Yamir’s new packaging plant in Kadi

Apart from the K&B 6 color plus coater press, the new Kadi plant has the Bobst Novacut ER for die cutting, the Bobst Novacut E for stripping, and the Bobst Expertfold and Bobst Ambition machines for folding and gluing cartons. All the machines are around six months old, being installed at the end of 2021. About his long association with Bobst, Mahadevia says, “At our main plant, we had put up our first Bobst machine in 1999 and that machine is still going strong. We are talking close to 23 years of 24×7 service. What more do you want?

“The biggest thing which differentiates Bobst from others is that I can depend on them – they won’t go back, they’ll give me consistent production and consistent quality, and the breakdown is practically nil. One customer alone will take up 60% of my capacity at this particular plant (Kadi). That’s why we have the Novacut ER blanking and the Expertfold which is going to do just those jobs. And to support them, we also have the Ambition and the Novacut E – equipment to just balance the workflow of the plant.”

Expansion during the pandemic

All of Mahadevia’s plants are supplying packaging materials to the food and pharma segments. As a result, the firm received all the permissions and approvals to run the plant on day three of the Covid-19-induced lockdown and was also completely stocked up with an inventory of raw materials. The Group added eight big clients during the lockdown and had to put up two new plants to cover the resulting volumes.

According to Mahadevia, the Indian monocarton market is growing at roughly 8% CAGR. “A special segment for startups has been created where the designs are pretty trendy and have to look good and the volumes are very low. I think this is one area that the commercial guys are capitalizing on. With the new startups coming up and the single-use plastic ban, I think monocartons are here to grow,” he adds. Yamir Packaging is currently looking at replacing its older converting machines with newer Bobst models, before expanding operations to other Indian states.

The Covid-19 pandemic led to the country-wide lockdown on 25 March 2020. It will be two years tomorrow as I write this. What have we learned in this time? Maybe the meaning of resilience since small companies like us have had to rely on our resources and the forbearance of our employees as we have struggled to produce our trade platforms.

The print and packaging industries have been fortunate, although the commercial printing industry is still to recover. We have learned more about the digital transformation that affects commercial printing and packaging. Ultimately digital will help print grow in a country where we are still far behind in our paper and print consumption and where digital is a leapfrog technology that will only increase the demand for print in the foreseeable future.

Web analytics show that we now have readership in North America and Europe amongst the 90 countries where our five platforms reach. Our traffic which more than doubled in 2020, has at times gone up by another 50% in 2021. And advertising which had fallen to pieces in 2020 and 2021, has started its return since January 2022.

As the economy approaches real growth with unevenness and shortages a given, we are looking forward to the PrintPack India exhibition in Greater Noida. We are again appointed to produce the Show Daily on all five days of the show from 26 to 30 May 2022.

It is the right time to support our high-impact reporting and authoritative and technical information with some of the best correspondents in the industry. Readers can power Packaging South Asia’s balanced industry journalism and help sustain us by subscribing.

– Naresh Khanna

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