Predictions for sustainable foods in 2017

Eco-labels, green packaging and track-and-trace

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sustainable
The share of sustainable sourced tea, cocoa, vanilla and sugar is expected to increase as large companies, such as Barry Callebaut and Givaudan, make ethical commitments

As food waste rises on the sustainability agenda, more food companies and retailers
will make waste reduction pledges. Food by-products will get greater recognition as a
raw material and become a source of new products. ReGrained (USA) is an example of
a sustainable food enterprise innovating using such raw materials.

Although admitting to some uncertainty about sustainability in the year ahead, Organic Monitor (www.organicmonitor.com) has given its predictions for sustainable foods in 2017.

Organic foods: Global sales of organic foods are expected to continue the positive trajectory, with most growth envisaged in North America and Northern Europe. Organic food sales in the US and Canada are predicted to surpass US$ 50 billion for the first time this year. The market share of organic foods is also expected to approach 7–10% in the US, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark and neighboring countries. With growth in organic farmland slowing, supply shortfalls are expected.

Eco-labelled foods: Fairtrade will retain its position as the second largest eco-label for food products, although fragmentation will continue: more fair trade labels and standards are envisaged. As will be shown in 2017 editions of the Sustainable Foods Summit (www.sustainablefoodssummit.com), other eco-labels are gaining traction in specific product categories; for instance, Rainforest Alliance for agricultural commodities and Marine Stewardship Council for seafood.

Sustainable sourcing: The market share of sustainably sourced ingredients is expected to rise. Roughly 20% of all coffee is now produced according to some sustainability scheme. The share of sustainably sourced tea, cocoa, vanilla and sugar is expected to increase as large companies, such as Barry Callebaut and Givaudan, make ethical commitments.

Sustainability metrics: Metrics are likely to gain prominence in the sustainability programs of food and ingredient companies. Whilst carbon and water footprints are still the most popular metrics, expect to see more metrics for energy, resource usage, waste and social parameters. More natural and organic food companies are envisaged to make carbon neutral and zero waste pledges.

Food authenticity and traceability: Greater investment is envisaged in ingredient supply chains to provide transparency and to reduce risks of food fraud and adulteration. Non-GMO labelling schemes are expected to continue to gain popularity in North America, although the GM labelling bill has been passed. Retail sales of Non-GMO Project Verified food sales are predicted to exceed US$ 20 billion in 2017.

Waste impacts: As food waste rises on the sustainability agenda, more food companies and retailers will make waste reduction pledges. Food by-products will get greater recognition as a raw material and become a source of new products. ReGrained (USA) is an example of a sustainable food enterprise innovating using such raw materials.

chocolate feature image

Green packaging: The adoption rate of sustainable materials, such as bioplastics, is expected to rise. More natural and organic food companies are likely to adopt such materials as they look to reduce their packaging impacts. The Sustainable Foods Summit will be covering these topics in greater depth during the course of the year. North American edition: 18-20 January, San Francisco; European edition: 1-2 June, Amsterdam; Latin
American edition: 18-20 September, São Paulo; Asia-Pacific edition: 29-30 November, Singapore.

The impact, resilience, and growth of responsible packaging in a wide region are daily chronicled by Packaging South Asia.

A multi-channel B2B publication and digital platform such as Packaging South Asia.is always aware of the prospect of new beginnings and renewal. Its 16-year-old print monthly, based in New Delhi, India has demonstrated its commitment to progress and growth. The Indian and Asian packaging industries have shown resilience in the face of ongoing challenges over the past three years.

As we present our publishing plan for 2023, India’s real GDP growth for the financial year ending 31 March 2023 will reach 6.3%. Packaging industry growth has exceeded GDP growth even when allowing for inflation in the past three years.

The capacity for flexible film manufacturing in India increased by 33% over the past three years. With orders in place, we expect another 33% capacity addition from 2023 to 2025. Capacities in monocartons, corrugation, aseptic liquid packaging, and labels have grown similarly. The numbers are positive for most of the economies in the region – our platform increasingly reaches and influences these.

Even given the disruptions of supply chains, raw material prices, and the challenge of responsible and sustainable packaging, packaging in all its creative forms and purposes has significant headroom to grow in India and Asia. Our context and coverage engulf the entire packaging supply chain – from concept to shelf and further – to waste collection and recycling. We target brand owners, product managers, raw material suppliers, packaging designers and converters, and recyclers.

In an admittedly fragmented and textured terrain, this is the right time to plan your participation and marketing support communication – in our impactful and highly targeted business platform. Tell us what you need. Speak and write to our editorial and advertising teams! For advertisement ads1@ippgroup.in , for editorial info@ippgroup.in and for subscriptions subscription@ippgroup.in

– Naresh Khanna

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